Categories ArchivesChemical Recovery

Record-breaking rural recycling volumes standard

Farmers and growers are proving their worth as good stewards of the land, by achieving record-breaking volumes of plastic recycling through the rural recycling programme, Agrecovery. The past year has seen a 43 percent increase in rural plastic coming back for recycling at Agrecovery’s sites, events and via on-farm pick-ups. The staggering 437 tonnes of plastic containers collected over the past year is now being given new life.  “This is a massive leap from the 320 tonnes collected the previous year,” says Agrecovery General Manager Simon Andrew. “The figures show that we are now recycling more than half of the agrichemical containers and drum plastic sold in the New Zealand market,” he says.  Those manufacturers who participate in the programme ...

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Support for rural recycling and ensuring absolute focus on effective services   standard

Supporting farmers to preserve the environment by providing alternatives to the harmful disposal practices of burning, burying and stockpiling of waste is vital for the future of New Zealand. Guidelines announced today by the Associate Minister for the Environment Eugenie Sage are a shot in the arm for rural recycling. The Minister launched a consultation, under the Waste Minimisation Act, which sees agrichemical containers and farm plastics become priority products. This means that manufacturers must take responsibility for any plastic packaging and unwanted product. Agrecovery, which runs such a scheme voluntarily, commends the government for ensuring that all product manufacturers participate in recycling and repurposing end-of-life product packaging. The focus needs to be on retaining convenient, reliable and cost-effective services ...

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Recycling project helps clear rural waste standard

Each week, thousands of kiwi homes wheel or carry their rubbish to the kerbside for collection. For rural communities, managing refuse is not such an easy task. Generations of kiwi farmers have had to find their own ways of clearing non-natural waste. A 2013 study by Environment Canterbury claimed that farms were producing nearly 10 tonnes of waste a year. Empty containers and drums, silage wrap, fertiliser bags and motor oil are just some of the items left over from the business of farming. Finding an efficient and sustainable solution can be confusing and time-consuming for farmers and growers, especially with each waste stream having its own processes for recycling or safe disposal. To add to the challenge, the options ...

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We turn plastic waste into something useful standard

Making plastic waste useful again by collaborating with industry partners is the driving force behind a rural recycling programme’s success. In the last year, Agrecovery recovered and recycled 308 tonnes of plastic that might otherwise be burnt, buried or dumped – “that is enough solid plastic to fill a rugby field six feet high”, says the programme’s general manager, Simon Andrew. The plastic is repurposed into underground utility coverings and building materials right here in New Zealand. Astron Plastics in Auckland takes the shredded plastic from Agrecovery and makes it into useful products again. “It’s an example of how manufacturers, industry and consumers can work together to reduce the harmful impacts of plastic waste in our environment,” says Andrew. Since ...

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We’re recovering smaller quantities of legacy and banned chemicals standard

Nearly four tonnes of unwanted agrichemicals, including DDT, lindane and arsenic-based pesticides were collected at a Marlborough chemical collection event in May. The good news is we’re recovering smaller quantities of legacy and banned chemicals from rural communities than in previous years. “More recent out-of-date chemicals are being recovered instead,” says Agrecovery General Manager, Simon Andrew. The majority collected at the event last month were fungicides from vineyards. “This shows that efforts by farmers, growers and recycling programmes are paying off,” he says. “Clearing old legacy chemicals ensures they don’t end up in landfills or being stored on farms and creating unnecessary risks for people, animals or the environment,” says Andrew. Marlborough District Council’s solid waste manager, Alec McNeil, says that New Zealand’s primary industries ...

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Farmers & growers demonstrate environmental commitment standard

Nine successive years of growth for Agrecovery Rural Recycling show that farmers and growers across the country are continuing to increase their sustainable recycling practices. Provisional results for the year ending June 2015 stand at 15,495kg of unwanted chemicals and 240,732kg of recycled plastic packaging collected by the industry good programme. This reflects a 50% jump in container recycling over a two year period. According to Adrienne Wilcock, Chair and Dairy NZ trustee on the Agrecovery Foundation, it was also a year of milestones for Agrecovery. “We exceeded one million kilograms of container plastic recycled since our 2007 launch and we now have over 10,000 farmer and grower members, one of whom won a new Suzuki motorbike in our recent ...

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Subsidised disposal for Auckland agchems standard

Auckland farmers and growers are being urged to make use of a subsidised programme to get rid of their unwanted agrichemicals. Agrecovery offers farmers the chance to safely dispose of potentially dangerous chemicals, with many free of charge or subsidised – they just need to book here by 2 May 2014 or ring 0800 247 326. Agrecovery Chair Graeme Peters says the collection is a crucial part of protecting the future of the industry. “These are chemicals that pose a safety risk by being left in sheds, or eventually end up in our waterways or on our land.” Safe and fully compliant, Agrecovery supports farmers and growers with a fully auditable report, which can be used for New Zealand GAP ...

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Funding still available for unwanted agchems standard

Waikato farmers and growers have until 28 March to take advantage of available funding for the disposal of unwanted agrichemicals at the upcoming Agrecovery collection. Waikato Regional Council has supplemented the funding provided by 57 Agrecovery brand owners for the collection and disposal of agrichemicals and animal health products. “We’ve received significant bookings for the collection, however funding is still available,” said Jason Richards, chemicals programme manager for Agrecovery. “We would like to see farmers and growers book safe disposal rather than leave old chemicals sitting in sheds on their property where they pose a real safety risk.” The booking deadline for those wanting to dispose of agrichemicals through Agrecovery is 28 March 2014. Many agrichemicals and animal health products ...

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Subsidised disposal for Canterbury agchems standard

Canterbury farmers and growers are being urged to make use of a subsidised programme to get rid of their unwanted agrichemicals. Agrecovery offers farmers the chance to safely dispose of potentially dangerous chemicals, with many free of charge or subsidised – they just need to book here by 28 March 2014 or ring 0800 247 326. Following on from previous years’ collections, Environment Canterbury is again partnering with Agrecovery to support this programme. Agrecovery Chair Graeme Peters says the collection is a crucial part of protecting the future of the industry. “These are chemicals that pose a safety risk by being left in sheds, or eventually end up in our waterways or on our land.” Safe and fully compliant, Agrecovery supports ...

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It’s the pits! standard

Getting a handle on non-natural rural waste in Canterbury Rural waste is poorly understood. The types and volumes of waste produced and the way it is managed remainssomewhat of a mystery, unlike urban waste management, which has been the primary focus of waste managers for the last few decades. Logistically and financially, good waste management is a difficult proposition for the majority of farmers and, anecdotally, this results in the adoption of less-than-desirable waste management practices, which may be impacting on our environment. In 2012, Environment Canterbury commissioned scoping studies to investigate the management of non-natural rural waste (non-organic, solid waste) generated by farms and agribusinesses in the region. The preliminary studies found that very little rural waste data exists ...

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